2012 Recap

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for my blog…It was fascinating to see a summary since starting Lindsay Plathe Marketing Consulting in September.  Along with being a marketing nerd, I’m also a nerd for numbers…this infographic made my day. 🙂

Here’s an excerpt:

The new Boeing 787 Dreamliner can carry about 250 passengers. This blog was viewed about 1,800 times in 2012. If it were a Dreamliner, it would take about 7 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Top 12 Ad Campaigns of the 20th Century

As I was doing my usual caffeinated, morning marketing research, I came across an awesome article on CNBC.  The following introduction written by Contence Parten which is what intrigued me to feature this on today’s post.

Top Ad Campaigns of the 20th Century“As the old adage goes, you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink. Nothing could be truer when it comes to advertising. Great ads can yield dramatic results, but if the product quality isn’t there, well, that horse won’t be pulling out the platinum card anytime soon.

Still, great ad campaigns can be revolutionary. They can change the way people live their daily lives—for better or for worse.[…]” 

Take a few minutes and think about how advertising has changed over the last 50+ years…it’s really quite remarkable.

12. Apple Computer’s “1984”

“This commercial, designed by the advertising agency Chiat/Day to introduce Apple’s Macintosh computer and directed by Ridley Scott—fresh off his science fiction classic Blade Runner—has never run again [on TV] since that Super Bowl spot. But few commercials have ever been more influential.Advertising Age named it the 1980s’ Commercial of the Decade. You can still see its echoes today in futuristic ads for technology and telecommunications multinationals such as AT&T, MCI, and Intel.”

11. Federal Express’ “Fast talker” (1982)

“Thirty years after making a name for himself as the fast talker in FedEx’s legendary ad campaign, John Moschitta unleashed his manic mouth on the world once more with a series of ads for JetBlue.”

 

10. Avis’ “We try harder” (1963) Avis Ad Campaign

“As Avis says on its website, “The phrase ‘We Try Harder’ has gone down in advertising history as one of the longest-lasting and respected taglines. The origination of the slogan was not to create a cute gimmick, but instead it was—and is—a business philosophy that every Avis employee holds true. ‘We Try Harder’ has helped Avis earn a reputation as one of the most admired businesses in the world.”

9. Clairol’s “Does she … or doesn’t she?” (1957) Clairol Ad Campaign

“How successful was this campaign? Well, Time magazine wrote in a 1967 article, ‘The question, as every reader of advertisements knows, refers to artificial hair color—and the odds on an affirmative answer have dropped from 15 to 1 to 2 to 1 since Miss Clairol first asked it 11 years ago. Sales of tints, rinses and dyes have risen from $25 million to $186 million a year. So popular is their use that some states no longer require women to list their hair color on their driver’s licenses.'”

8. Miller Lite’s “Tastes great, less filling” (1974)

“For years, Miller Lite drinkers, including notables like comic Rodney Dangerfield and football coach John Madden, bickered back and forth. Some said the drink tasted great. Others said it was less filling.

The commercials were a big hit for the brewing company, which revived the campaign in 2008, albeit using an arguably better looking cast of characters than in Dangerfield’s and Madden’s day.”

7. Absolut Vodka’s Absolut Bottle (1981) 

“The campaign was such a success that Absolut continues to use it today. In fact, according to AbsolutAds.com, ‘Absolut Vodka’s advertising campaign is the world’s longest-ever uninterrupted one. To date it comprises 1,450 original ads, with more added each month.'”

 

6. DeBeers’ “A diamond is forever” (1948) Diamond is Forever Campaign

“An advertising campaign can last forever as well, it seems.[…]  As the De Beers website explains, ‘In 1947 a young copywriter called Frances Gerety was working with De Beers and was given a brief to compose a line that encompassed and expressed the physical attributes and legends surrounding the diamond. The understanding is that she worked late into the night on the challenging brief and, about to admit defeat, she then scribbled the sentence which would later be voted as the most iconic advertising slogan of the twentieth century—A Diamond Is Forever. Books and films of cult status have been named after this tagline, and a song featuring the phrase has been recorded numerous times by some of the world’s most popular artists.'”

5. McDonald’s “You Deserve a Break Today” (1971) McDonald's Ad Campaign

“Ronald McDonald, the true icon of the McDonald’s brand, hasn’t been in every single ad campaign. The fast-food chain turned its attention to busy consumers in this 1971 campaign, focusing on the ease with which a McDonald’s meal could be obtained.”

4. Nike’s “Just Do It” (1988) Nike's Just Do It Campaign

“In 2008, Nike celebrated one of the most memorable advertising campaign slogans in history by creating new ads  to air during the Beijing Olympic games.”

3. Marlboro’s “Marlboro Man” (1955) Marlboro Ad Campaign

“It doesn’t get much more iconic than this. As AdAge.com wrote of this legendary ad campaign, “The most powerful—and in some quarters, most hated—brand image of the century, the Marlboro Man stands worldwide as the ultimate American cowboy and masculine trademark, helping establish Marlboro as the best-selling cigarette in the world.  ‘Today, even a mention of the Marlboro Man as an effective ad icon brings protests from health-care workers who see firsthand the devastation wrought by decades of cigarette smoking. More than any other issue, the ethics of tobacco advertising—both morally and legally—have divided the advertising industry.'”

2. Coca-Cola’s “The pause that refreshes” (1929) 

“‘I’ve always admired brands that preserve their core campaign for decades,’ wrote independent ad counsel Chris Macrae in an article on AllAboutBranding.com.  ‘Coca-Cola provided a stunning example with “Pause that Refreshes” (USA 1930s to 1950s) uplifting a nation at time of depression, championing a product which literally fuelled—emotionally and physically—what was then a developing nation, lobbying the US war office on the extreme fatigue of war and thereby becoming the GI’s mascot during World War 2 and making Coke available at 5c per bottle wherever GIs went.'”

1. Volkswagen’s “Think Small” Campaign (1959)

“Kurt Kroner was the man behind the defining example of the greatest advertising campaign of the century, according to AdAge.com.  ‘He wasn’t the copywriter. That was Julian Koenig. Nor was he the art director. That was Helmut Krone. Nor was he elsewhere employed by Doyle Dane Bernbach, the agency that stormed the confining Bastille of advertising orthodoxy to ignite the “creative revolution”.'”

“Actually, our hero wasn’t in advertising at all. Kurt Kroner was the one, among 3,389 Wolfsburg, Germany, assembly plant workers, to flag a blemished chrome strip on the glove compartment of a 1961 Volkswagen Beetle and reject the vehicle for delivery. Yes, if we are to believe Koenig’s copy, Herr Kroner gave us the famously failed and fabulously forlorn ‘Lemon.'”

“God bless him, because in so doing he also gave advertising permission to surprise, to defy and to engage the consumer without bludgeoning him about the face and body. Kroner offered up a lemon with approximately the same result of Eve offering the apple. Not only did everything change, but suddenly things were a lot more interesting.”

 

I hope you enjoyed your history/marketing lesson for the day and that you found it as interesting as I did.  Thanks for stopping by!

Facebook stats and the Plathe Pumpkin Patch…hey, that kind of rhymes :)

FaceHappy Friday!

Today, I would like to explore the topic of Facebook page statistics.

Alert: This is yet another marketing aspect that makes me happy 🙂 —Yup, another nerd-out blog post.

The Facebook business page we will be exploring today is actually a business that is incredibly near and dear to me…the Plathe Pumpkin Patch!  I told you that entrepreneurship is in my blood.

**In case you’re wondering, this is my awesome family. 🙂

Up until this year, the way we spread the word about the Plathe Pumpkin Patch was through newspaper ads each Fall, word of mouth, and hand-made signs on the main roads near our home.  The news really got out when we began hosting field trips for several local elementary schools along with donating gourds and small pumpkins to local churches.  Well, to stay fresh, we enlisted the help of the World Wide Web.  The best part…it’s FREE!

A few weeks ago, I was chatting with my mama on the phone and she asked me if I could help her set up a Facebook page for the Pumpkin Patch.  This year is our 7th year of being open, and she found out that we have some competition in the area this year.

Well I told her that I would help manage the page when I had time, but Mom pleasantly surprised me…apparently marketing runs in my blood, too.  This woman is a marketing machine!  It brings a giant smile to my face when I see a Plathe Pumpkin Patch post pop up on my newsfeed almost everyday. 😀  Go Mom!

Back to the main subject of today’s blog post: Facebook stats.  Mom doesn’t know this nifty info yet either…:)

Alright, these are some of the stats from the day the Plathe Pumpkin Patch Facebook page was created until today.  At first glance, you see an overall decrease, and you’re probably thinking, “Lindsay, this is bad…why are you showing me this?”.   Let’s take a closer look:  As you can see the blue dots represent how many total people saw the Plathe Pumpkin Patch page through friends and friends of friends.  The number began at 2,423 people on September 14, peaked at 2,610 people reached on September 17, and has leveled out to reaching 230-240 people per day.  I don’t know about you, but I am impressed!  The purple dots represent when a post is made on the page, so by comparing the blue line to each purple dot, one can determine how many people each post reached.  The portion of greatest increase in people reached seemed to be correlated with adding pictures to the page along with general excitement about a new page for a business that people recognize.

This next graph is pretty neat, too.

This graph breaks down the demographic information, such as age and gender, of all the people who have “Liked” the Plathe Pumpkin Patch page.  As you can see, more than 86% of the “Likes” are from females with 20.8% of them being between the ages of 35-44.  This information can be used in the future to design other marketing material in a way that appeals primarily to women in the highest percent age groups.  Great for any business to know especially if you are unsure of your primary target market!

These graphs are only a small portion of the information that is available through your Facebook page’s “Insights” tab.  However, just a note: to have access to this information, you must be an administrator of the page and have at least 30 “Likes”.

I would love to keep spewing out other interesting things you can find on your Facebook page, but this post has already turned into somewhat of a novel.  Thanks for hanging in there. 🙂  I hope you learned something new…and maybe even had a nerd-out moment.

*Note:  This information about traffic/hits is also available on almost all websites…in fact, I have the stats available to me on this blog site (WordPress).  It tells me how many people were on my blog, which post they spent the most time on, and how they found the link to my blog (i.e. Facebook, search engine, etc).

There’s nothing like a great “before & after”

I’ve already been busy working on my first clients’ marketing. 🙂  So ladies and gents, I would like to present to you Shirley and Phil Larson Real Estate Team!  Check out some of the work I did for them!

              

This is the coverpage of Shirley and Phil’s book that they showed to their real estate clients.  To add a more professional and consistent look, I created a letterhead and a brief description of who the Larson’s are.  This page is the first thing clients see, so it was important for it to make a great impression right off the bat.

I would also like to show you the information pages within each client sales book…

                                 

  

The 2 pages above were included within Shirley and Phil’s sales booklet.  In order to effectively brand anything or anybody, consistency is crucial!  The page to the left is an example of the letterhead that I designed to match the coverpage.  Each page of the booklet is printed with this look to give it a cohesive image.  It also displays the Larson’s picture and logo along with their contact information.

Now for the brochure! 🙂

 

The first brochure is from about 10 years ago, when Shirley and Phil’s main focus was raising their children and finding a home for their  clients to raise their families as well.  In 2012, Shirley and Phil’s children are grown, and they still would like to find their clients family homes.  However, their updated brochure now highlights the vast experience that they have in the real estate industry.  It also sticks to the blue theme found on their letterhead.  It was important for Shirley and Phil to feature their past clients’ testimonials and recommendations in their new brochure.  These are like gold for any business! 🙂

My other main project for the Larson’s was their Facebook page…When I began just a little over a month ago, they had 11 “Likes” and today they have 47 “Likes”!  They are now reaching more than 4 times as many people as before by interacting with their Facebook friends.  This was done by regularly posting real estate related media such as articles, videos, and current home listings.  I also incorporated a Facebook icon on all their new print material in order to increase traffic on their updated page.

Now all that’s left to ask is, “Are you interested in real estate South of the River in the Twin Cities??”   Shirley they can Phil your real estate needs!  Check them out on Facebook by searching ShirleyAndPhilLarsonRealEstateTeam or their website: www.soldbylarsons.com

If you think anything in this post would help you and your small business, I would love to help!!  Shoot me an email to inquire about any marketing consulting I can do for you.  lgplathe08@ole.augie.edu

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